• Elbow (Right Side)
  • Elbow (Left Side)
  • Description

The bone of the arm (humerus) meets both the ulna (the inner bone of the forearm) and radius (the outer bone of the forearm) to form a hinge joint at the elbow. ... The outer bony prominence of the elbow is the lateral epicondyle, a part of the humerus bone.

ELBOw PAIN

Lateral epicondylitis, also called tennis elbow, is the most common cause of elbow pain and refers to inflammation of the tendon that attaches the elbow bone to the forearm muscles used to extend the wrist and fingers. ... Difficulties gripping objects is another potential symptoms of lateral epicondylitis.

common causes

  • Broken arm

A broken arm involves one or more of the three bones in your arm — the ulna, radius and humerus. One of the most common causes of a broken arm is falling onto an outstretched hand. If you think you or your child has broken an arm, seek prompt medical attention. It’s important to treat a fracture as soon as possible for proper healing.

  • Golfer’s elbow

Golfer’s elbow, also known as medial epicondylitis, is caused by damage to the muscles and tendons that control your wrist and fingers. The damage is typically related to excess or repeated stress — especially forceful wrist and finger motions. Improper lifting, throwing or hitting, as well as too little warmup or poor conditioning, also can contribute to golfer’s elbow.

  • Dislocated elbow

A dislocated elbow occurs when the bones that make up the joint are forced out of alignment — typically when you land on an outstretched hand during a fall. The elbow is the second most commonly dislocated joint after the shoulder in adults, and the most commonly dislocated joint in children.

  • Bursitis

Bursitis  is a painful condition that affects the small, fluid-filled sacs — called bursae that cushion the bones, tendons and muscles near your joints. Bursitis occurs when bursae become inflamed.

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